June 2016 Member Spotlight: Rafael Moscatel, IGP, CRM

June 2016 Member Spotlight: Rafael Moscatel, IGP, CRM

Very proud to be featured by ARMA’s Info Pro publication this month!

Jun 15, 2016

Meet Rafael Moscatel, IGP, CRMMoscatel - Member Spotlight

ARMA received the following nomination from April Dmytrenko, CRM, FAI, for the Member Spotlight:

Rafael Moscatel is a Certified Records Manager (CRM) and Information Governance Professional (IGP) with more than 20 years of experience implementing world-class records retention, data governance, and compliance programs for large enterprises. He designed process transformations, led team-building efforts, and spearheaded change management initiatives in a variety of complex and highly regulated industries. His expertise includes developing document management strategies, decommissioning legacy systems, performing risk assessments, and performing audit remediation.

Rafael truly understands his field and specifically IG and technology. He was instrumental in rolling out the enterprise-wide program at Paramount Pictures. Now he is working for Farmers Group, where he has established an outstanding IG framework from which to continue to support an effective program. He is proactive, strategic, and not only a talented RIM professional but an excellent business professional. He develops outstanding collaborative relationships, understands the value of senior management support and involving the business units, and is a strategic risk taker.

Moscatel lives and works in Los Angeles. He serves as the director of information governance for Farmers Group, Inc. He has been an ARMA member for 12 years.

As you can tell, Rafael is a great fit for the Member Spotlight, an honor meant to recognize members’ involvement within the profession and the association. If you would like to network with him, you can contact him through LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/rafaelmoscatel or at rafaelmoscatelcrm.wordpress.com

 

Read More Here….

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The Paperless Office

By Rafael Moscatel

The extent to which any organization can reduce its dependency on paper is largely determined by laws and the industry regulations it faces, the technology available to it and how well its leaders manage change, internally as well as for customers.

Here are some thoughts on how to begin solving the paper problem around your office:

Understand the affordances of paper  One of the most thorough examinations of the issue of paper and its role in our lives and workplaces came in 2002 when MIT press published The Myth of the Paperless Office.  The book’s findings make a case for the “affordances of paper” and stress that to reduce paper production and consumption we must understand the underlying habits and processes driving how our clients and colleagues work.

Attorneys for example often require a contextual or “case at a glance” perspective that a chronological or issue focused file offers… a “story telling” approach to presenting information which can’t always be matched even with the best software. Similarly, auditors or project managers will often work with and create aggregated records which serve a specific purpose for which imaging might be overkill or too costly. And contrary to popular belief, there still exist quite a few scenarios where it remains more affordable, practical and efficient to even store information in paper form. Conversion costs and risks required to maintain the digital lifecycle of infrequently referenced documents and avoid bitrot* can often exceed those associated with retaining the same materials in paper form.

Make the right policy changes with executive level support  Every Records or Information Governance policy initiative or project your business undertakes should have senior level executive support and reflect the best practices within your industry.

Here are some policy and procedural ideas to consider that can act as catalysts for change.

  • Get a Retention Policy / Schedule, implement it and regularly enforce it -A Retention Schedule (often in line with a data map) is the most effective tool for properly managing records and information and its necessity cannot be understated.  It not only protects an organization and keeps paper and electronic storage costs low, it gives executives a tool for understanding and navigating the massive network of silos and records their businesses create.
  • Institute an E-signature Policy for all contracts under a specified financial threshold
  • De-duplicate emails and all other electronic content repositories systematically
  • Identify where duplicates are created, determine why and what can be done to prevent them going forward
  • Take a “final draft and / or executed version” approach to your document lifecycle rules
  • Establish “uniform” email retention rules.  For example –  enforced retention period, tools and rules for what to do with attachments
  • Standardize e-mail signatures corporate wide
  • Discourage personal chronological or “work” files
  • Place restrictions on file shares and acceptable file formats within repositories
  • Evaluate all forms and documents in all files to identify consolidation opportunities and streamline workflows
  • Train employees to properly recognize records and understand legal holds and custodianship

Continue reading

A Record Of The Film

I was recently asked exactly how my background in archives and information technology assisted me with my documentary, The Little Girl with the Big Voice.  I hadn’t really thought about it until that point because it was a passion project and I was so wrapped up in telling the story it didn’t seem to matter. In retrospect, my years in Records & Information Management really were instrumental in helping me collect, organize and clear all of the materials for this film.  Filmmaking involves a lot of document management, project management and asset management and always has.  Understanding how to organize large collections of materials, authenticate and reference them contextually proved very useful in creating the historical sequences seen in the film.

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The Little Girl with the Big Voice examines the struggles of women and children in the early 1930’s and 40’s through the eyes of Mary Small, a child prodigy, restless wife and dedicated mother whose resilience in the face of constant challenges made her a defining symbol of her generation.

When it came time to putting together a clip log, the metadata and information I collected and associated with each piece of media made it easy for me to clear each image which is essential to secure a good insurance policy. In doing so, a lot of the principles I’ve learned as an Information Governance Professional came into play in terms of ensuring authenticity. As a result of properly documenting my sources from the get-go I ended up with a treasure chest of digital resources that I can now use over and over.  My experiences with digital imaging also helped with rendering the scans and pictures I used and in resolving pixelation issues.  The organization of documents and images into (hopefully) logical historical sequences based on various data points, is very much a business discipline.

Stills Part 3

I also wanted this film to be an example of how filmmakers can use the Fair Use Doctrine to uncover and tell some of the richest, most compelling stories of this era, which were until the advent of the internet, almost trapped in library catalogs and press break scrapbooks.

So I teamed up with Stanford University’s Documentary Film Program and learned how to present these images in context so that they passed muster.  Doing so probably reduced the cost of the film’s licensing fees by as much as 90% or more and the research alone gave us a cache of items that we can hopefully use to tell another great story.

Click here to visit Kickstarter campaign.  Please check it out and consider supporting us!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/marysmall/the-little-girl-with-the-big-voice-documentary/widget/video.html

ARMA Live 2014 Conference Reflections

I walked into the ARMA Live conference this year with a few reservations, but I couldn’t have been more surprised and impressed by the level of expertise and offerings being showcased. Clearly, Julie Colgan, Fred Pulzello and the whole ARMA organization have done a magnificent job of elevating the conversation and redefining our relevance and roles as Records and Information Governance professionals.

Of course, “Information Governance,” as a concept and a buzzword had an overwhelming presence from the expo to the sessions, and there were the detractors, but I’ve grown to understand and appreciate both the evolution of our discipline and the re-branding. Unfortunately, I missed the keynote speech that everybody was talking about until the end of the conference, Rick Smolan’s The Human Face of Big Data.

It was truly a pleasure to have the opportunity to socialize with some of my colleagues, including Doug Williams of Williams Data Management, April Dmytrenko who gave the closing, and Frank Lopez from my old firm who is now studying to be a Certified Records Manager!

Of particular interest, and not simply because she was my mentor, was April Dmytrenko’s well versed, eclectic and educated closing panel.  It was so refreshing to hear the insights of attorneys like John Isaza, IT foks, and past ARMA presidents discussing yesterday, today and tomorrow with such hands on experience!

I came back to my company with ideas and inspiration, and I think that’s exactly what ARMA wanted. This is the time for our profession, and we are moving in the right direction!

I do have one criticism, however. Although ARMA offered a set of tools to plan the conference and well-planned events, the organization and close relations like ICRM needed to do a better job of organizing and delivering their educational resources on their portals. Organizations which espouse best practices and technology should have those principles and resources married and reflected on their websites.  It is time for ARMA and the ICRM to get up to speed on practicing what it preaches when it comes to social media, content delivery and management on their respective websites.  Even with recent changes, profile and account management is still cumbersome.  Also, marketing resources from the conference, including the ARMA TV videos, are not available in a readily shareable format.

Nonetheless, I was very proud of the profession, very happy I made the drive down, and I look forward to next year in Maryland. Congratulations, ARMA!